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JYM Shred - 240 Kapsel

JYM Shred - 240 Kapsel

€70.00


THREE STAGE
FAT-LOSS
POWERHOUSE!

The fully dosed, non-proprietary fat burner
created and used by Dr.Jim Stoppani

Jim Stoppani, PhD

Owner - JYM Supplement Science

When you're ready to elevate your shred and torch some serious body fat, there are three things you need: a solid training program, like my Shortcut to Shred workouts; a solid diet, like my Shortcut to Shred nutrition plan; and a solid supplement regimen to supercharge the fat loss you've initiated through hard work and clean eating. Shred JYM is that entire supplement regimen in one fat-blasting formula. It's a powerfully dosed, fully loaded fat-loss weapon built with six synergistic ingredients. It's my personal fat-loss blend.*

The Science of Shred JYM

Like all the products in my JYM Supplement Science line, Shred JYM doesn't cut any corners. There's a reason one serving of Shred JYM requires four capsules: because one serving provides you with 2,750 mg of active, science-backed, fat-burning ingredients and absolutely zero filler. If you add up the doses listed on the supplement facts panel of any other fat burner on the market, none of them come close to 2,750 mg of active ingredients.*

Unfortunately, when it comes to dosing and total ingredients, many supplement companies take a "less is more" approach to maximize profit on a given product. Sadly this "less is more" strategy doesn't apply to your results. Fat burners that require only one or two capsules per dose may sound convenient, but you end up sacrificing active ingredients and your own results.*

Also like the rest of the JYM Supplement Science line, Shred JYM does not use proprietary blends. Every ingredient is proudly displayed alongside its actual dose on the supplement facts panel. I've been educating consumers for over a decade on the proper doses of specific fat-loss ingredients, and Shred JYM contains those same ingredients at the most effective doses. Nothing is hidden or kept secret, so you can rest assured that Shred JYM contains no filler or pixie-dust blends.

All the ingredients in Shred JYM have been suggested in clinical studies to effectively promote fat loss.* Plus, they have all been shown to be safe. These are the same ingredients I use when I need to kick my cut up a notch. I wouldn't create a product that wasn't proven to be safe and expect you to use it, because I wouldn't use it myself. Shred JYM doesn't just have my name on it. It's what I use.

Three-Stage Fat Loss

Shred JYM attacks body fat from three different angles to supercharge your shred. First, the synergistic ingredients in Shred JYM support the release of fat from your fat cells.* Then, they help transport more of that fat into your mitochondria, or cellular power plants. Finally, Shred JYM increases your metabolic rate to burn up all of that transported fat as fuel.*

Release

If you want to drop body fat, you need to reduce the size of your fat cells. When you get lean, you don't actually get rid of fat cells. You just shrink them. Unless you get liposuction, you're stuck with the fat cells you already have.

To get leaner, you need to reduce the amount of fat your fat cells store to effectively make them smaller. In other words, you need to encourage fat to flee from your fat cells. The caffeine and synephrine in Shred JYM work via two different mechanisms to help push fat from your cells.*

Transport

Getting fat to leave your cells is the first step to getting leaner, but it's only 1/3 of the equation. If it's not used for fuel, fat can actually go back into your fat cells and get stored again! To prevent this from happening, you have to push fat into your mitochondria, which are your cellular power plants. The mitochondria take fat, carbs, and the breakdown products of protein and convert them into usable energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, which your muscles use to contract during exercise.

The problem with most stored and dietary fat is that it needs to be escorted into the mitochondria. When you follow a fat-loss diet, work out, and use fat-burning supplements like caffeine and synephrine, you generate more freed-up fat than normal. This overloads the typical transport system, which prevents some of that fat from reaching the mitochondria.

The acetyl-L-carnitine in Shred JYM helps ramp up your fatty acid transport system and get more fat to its final destination.* Research suggests that supplementing with carnitine, such as acetyl-L-carnitine, may help more fat move into the mitochondria to be burned for fuel.*

Burn

To ensure long-term weight loss, you have to crank up your body's energy requirements to make your mitochondria burn more fat for fuel. The simplest way to do this is with exercise. Exercise makes your mitochondria burn up more carbs, fat, and protein to produce more ATP. Exercise also helps you burn more calories at rest, at least for several hours after a given workout is over.

However, your metabolic rate can drop the longer you diet and more drastically you lower your calorie intake. The EGCG from the green tea extract, capsaicin from the Capsimax® Cayenne pepper extract, synephrine from Advantra Z®, caffeine, and L-tyrosine work to ramp up the activity of your mitochondria so that more fat is converted into ATP. These ingredients stoke your metabolic fire, so to speak, and keep it burning hot.*

Shred Strong

Shred JYM is built on the very ingredients I use to torch fat, augment my training program, and enhance the impact of my diet. I use this blend when I need to cut a few extra pounds or prep for a shoot. It's my go-to formula, but I didn't just create it for myself. I created it for you.

Hit the JYM!

Jim Stoppani, PhD

Owner, JYM Supplement Science

Shred JYM Features

  • 6 research-backed ingredients provided in their proper doses.
  • 5 grams (1500 milligrams) of acetyl-L-carnitine to help carry more fat into the mitochondria, where it is burned away for good.*
  • 500 milligrams of green tea extract to increase metabolic rate and burn up more calories and fat.*
  • 200 milligrams of caffeine to release more fat from your body's fat cells so that it can be burned as fuel.*
  • 500 milligrams of L-tyrosine to help enhance your mood and alertness.*
  • 50 milligrams of Capsimax® Cayenne pepper extract to boost metabolism and support craving control, which helps you consume fewer calories but burn more.*
  • 20 milligrams Advantra Z® synephrine to release more fat from fat cells, boost metabolic rate and fat burning, and reduce hunger.*

Under the Hood

Shred JYM goes head-to-head with the 5 leading fat burner products on the market today.

Inside the Shred

Let's get out the microscope and take an even closer look at the six ingredients and doses used to make Shred JYM a safe and effective fat burner.

*1.5 grams (1500 mg) of Acetyl-L-Carnitine

  • This form of carnitine is absorbed by the body better than regular L-carnitine. The acetyl group also allows it to be taken up by the brain, which can promote better brain function and mood, as well as enhance energy levels. This can be particularly important when dieting.*
  • The most critical role that carnitine plays in the body is helping transport fat across the mitochondria of cells. The mitochondria are essentially all cells' power plants, where the majority of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is derived for energy. Once fatty acids pass into the mitochondria, they can be oxidized ("burned") to generate ATP. Without adequate carnitine, most dietary fats cannot get into the mitochondria and be burned for fuel.
  • Several research studies support the notion that supplementing with carnitine enhances fat burning, not just during exercise, but also at rest.* Carnitine's ability to increase the amount of fat burned at rest means that it has solid potential to aid fat loss and reduce fat gain during bulking periods.*

*500 mg of Green Tea Extract

  • Green tea (Camellia sinensis) contains compounds called catechins, including epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main catechin responsible for green tea's thermogenic effects. EGCG inhibits an enzyme that normally breaks down norepinephrine, the neurotransmitter involved in regulating metabolic rate and fat-burning. By inhibiting this enzyme, you maintain higher levels of norepinephrine, which encourages greater calorie and fat burn.*
  • In addition to aiding fat loss, green tea has been suggested to have a laundry list of benefits. These include health and performance benefits, which include promoting muscle and joint health.*
  • While drinking green tea has become more popular lately, supplementing with green tea extract is far more beneficial. Research confirms that the catechins in green tea, such as EGCG, are absorbed better in supplement form than in tea form.

*200 mg of Caffeine

  • Caffeine is recognized around the world for its ability to enhance alertness and brain function. Therefore its role in fat loss is assumed to be due mainly to its ability to increase calorie burn.*
  • Caffeine also contributes to fat loss by helping release more fat from your fat cells and reduce fat storage.*
  • Caffeine is now credited with providing a multitude of health benefits, such as supporting cognitive function.*

*500 mg of L-Tyrosine

  • This amino acid has a tested track record for supporting alertness, mental focus, mood and energy, especially when combined with caffeine, as in Shred JYM.*
  • The body uses tyrosine to produce several important hormones and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, epinephrine (adrenaline), norepinephrine, and thyroid hormones. Increased levels of these hormones and neurotransmitters ramps you up, making you more alert and focused. This is important when dieting since lowering your calorie intake can decrease your energy levels, mood, and mental sharpness.*
  • It is also suggested that, during times of stress, such as when dieting and training hard, the body's ability to produce its own tyrosine from the amino acid phenyalaine is compromised. So taking L-tyrosine before workouts ensures that your body has adequate levels to produce the hormones and neurotransmitters discussed above.

50 mg of Capsimax® Cayenne Pepper Extract

  • Capsaicin is the major pungent substance in red hot peppers, such as cayenne chili peppers. It works to ramp up metabolic activity, which increases the amount of calories and fat your body burns. Capsaicin also reduces hunger and food intake so that you consumer fewer calories while burning more.*
  • Research suggests that supplementing with capsaicin may help with fat loss over time.*
  • One problem with consuming hot red pepper extract is that it is extremely spicy. Many people cannot tolerate the "heat" from hot peppers, which irritates the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. Capsimax® uses technology to avoid the irritation but deliver the benefits of capsaicin.
  • Capsimax® is a patented form of pepper extract that delivers 300,000 Scoville Heat Units (SHU). It uses the OmniBead™ beadlet technology to encapsulate the pepper extract. The coating is designed to withstand the highly acidic, low pH levels of the stomach then release the capsaicin in the higher pH environment of the intestines.*

*20 mg of Synephrine from Advantra Z®

  • Synpehrine is the active ingredient in the plant Citrus aurantium, also known as bitter orange. It stimulates specific receptors that support the release of fat from fat cells, and it promotes the metabolic rate while supporting appetite control.*
  • Several studies confirm that synephrine is both effective for fat loss and is very safe.*
  • Advantra Z® is a patented form of Citrus aurantium extract that delivers a precise and effective dose of synephrine.*

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